Fall 2012


Chicano Hispano Mexicano Studies
Fall 2012 Course Offerings

CHMS 201 001 27528 Introduction to Chicano Hispano Mexicano Studies
ONLINE Staff

Over the past four decades, Chicano/a Studies has emerged as a complex, and sometimes controversial, field within both the US academy and New Mexican popular debate. This course will introduce students to the field of Chicano/a Studies and the related issues that impact and shape US Latina/o communities. We will focus on New Mexican communities that might define themselves as Hispano, Mexicano, Chicano, Hispanic, Spanish, or Mexican, and will also address issues pertinent to the US more generally. The study of the US-Mexico border and its geographic and conceptual shifts will be the course’s central organizing theme. This border is both a political barrier etched into the landscape and, perhaps even more significantly, a metaphorical space of cultural and identity formation that addresses racial, gender, sexual, and class borders as well.
*Satisfies Group V Humanities Requirement/College of Arts & Sciences.
Cross listed with NATV 255 003 and AMST 200 001

CHMS 201 002 21409 Introduction to Chicano Hispano Mexicano Studies

TR 1400-1515 Carmen Samora

Over the past four decades, Chicano/a Studies has emerged as a complex, and sometimes controversial, field within both the US academy and New Mexican popular debate. This course will introduce students to the field of Chicano/a Studies and the related issues that impact and shape US Latina/o communities. We will focus on New Mexican communities that might define themselves as Hispano, Mexicano, Chicano, Hispanic, Spanish, or Mexican, and will also address issues pertinent to the US more generally. The study of the US-Mexico border and its geographic and conceptual shifts will be the course’s central organizing theme. This border is both a political barrier etched into the landscape and, perhaps even more significantly, a metaphorical space of cultural and identity formation that addresses racial, gender, sexual, and class borders as well.
*Satisfies Group V Humanities Requirement/College of Arts & Sciences.
Cross listed with NATV 255 003 and AMST 200 001

CHMS 201 625 43921 Introduction to Chicano Hispano Mexicano Studies
TR 0930-1045 Carmen Samora Freshman Learning Community


CHMS 332 001 35986 Introduction to Chicana Studies
TR 0930-1045 Staff

This general survey course introduces students to knowledge production on and academic approaches relevant to Chicana women’s diverse and changing social statuses from the times of Indigenous sovereignties preceding European interventions in Mexico to the late 20th century. The course traces economic and political transitions highlighting generalized mutations of racial/ethnic, gender, sexuality, social rank/class, and cultural expressions reflecting the conditions and the dominant attitudes of women’s subordination. Course materials will highlight Chicana/Mexican/Indigenous women’s attempts to challenge notions of inferiority and rationalizations for dominance through actions and power contestations and, in turn, contextualize these actions socially, economically and politically.
Cross listed with WMST 332/AMS

CHMS 393 006 Raza Genders & Sexualities
M 1830-2100 Staff

Course Description: In this interdisciplinary course we will study Latin@ culture and activism as they are informed by and intersect with performances of gender and sexual identities. We will especially focus on expressive culture including creative writing, visual art, and other mediums while considering Latin@ culture as a field of struggles over belonging and representation. Feminist analysis and queer critique will be central to our work. Students will be expected to write responses to texts including readings, films, exhibitions, or other cultural productions. As well, they will complete a final analytical project that demonstrates aptitude in an aspect of Latin@ sexualities and genders.
Offered with AMST 330 006, SOC 398 009 and WMST 379 006

CHMS 393 008 45007 Iconic Women-Iconos Femeninos
TR 1600-1715 Patricia Rosas-Lopategui

En este curso estudiaremos a algunas de las figuras femeninas más relevantes de la cultura mexicana que han rebasado las fronteras y continúan impactando la identidad de las mujeres en pleno siglo XXI. Haremos un recorrido histórico comenzando con la trascendencia de Sor Juana Inés e la Cruz para conectarla con las productoras de cultura en la vanguardia mexicana (Nahui Olin, Antonieta Rivas Mercado, entre otras); con las transgresoras del México posrevolucionario (Elena Garro, Guadalupe Amor, Rosario Castellanos) y llegar a las mujeres irreverentes del presente milenio (Silvia Molina, Ana Clavel, Cristina Rivera Garza, entre otras). Tendremos un marco teórico feminista. Se leerán poemas, cuentos, entrevistas, obras de teatro y veremos algunas películas. La lectura y la participación son relevantes. Habrá reportes de lectura y una presentación final.
Taught in Spanish
Offered with SPAN 301 010

CHMS 393 009 40733 Chicana(o) Cultural Studies
TR 1600-1715 Michael Trujillo

This course traces the development of Chicana/o Cultural Studies and its social/historical contexts. Course materials will consist of key texts created by Chicana/o scholars that exemplify the discipline. We will simultaneously maintain a thematic focus in the historical development of literature and explore topics such as Chicano/a history, politics, immigration, literature, art, and the related issues of race/ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality.

CHMS 393 010 45262 Vatos-Homegirls in Literature and Film
MW 1100-1215 Lorena Galvan-Valenzuela

This course will focus on the cultural and ethnic representation of El Pachuco/a, El Vato Loco and La Chola in Chicana/o literature and film to analyze how Chicanas/os, and mainstream America construct and re-figure these subjects. At issue will be the performance of gendered bodies and politicized mythos by which these social subjects are seen as an embodiment of revolutionary identity by some and as delinquent subjects by others. This course begins with the zoot suit subculture of the early 1940s; moves to Chicano movement narratives of El Pachuco, next the literature and film of the 1990s that offer many interpretive possibilities for how El Vato and La Chola are represented, and concludes with contemporary Chicana homegirl narratives that challenge and disrupt private and public norms.
Taught in English this semester
Offered with SPAN 301 012

CHMS 393 013 45267 El Movimiento: Chicano Movement
TR 17:30-18:45 Jacobo Baca

This course will explore the Chicano Movement beyond the 1960s Civil Rights era, exploring both the precursors to the political movement as well as the legacy of the Chicano movement and its effect on society and academia. Though Chicanos place their origin in the mestizaje of colonialism, where Iberian and Indigenous roots connected, perhaps the true root of Chicano ethnicity lies in the Chicano movement. In a mere two decades, artists, philosophers, poets, activists and others validated Mexican American ethnicity and culture, creating an identity that was both derivative and foundational to the Chicano movement. We will look at the precursors of the Chicano movement like LULAC and the American GI Forum and their impact on American society. A significant portion of this course will be exploring the Chicano movement itself, its leaders and organizations, regional variations and ask what ultimately undermined unity and led to fragmentation. We will end this course by considering the legacies of the Chicano movement and consider where Chicanismo stands in a globalizing world among pan-ethnic identities like Hispanic or Latino.

CHMS 393 022 42637 New Mexico’s Literary Landscape & Beyond
W 1600-1830 Levi Romero

This is a survey course of Chicano/a letters and the spoken word tradition in New Mexico and beyond. Beginning with the Discovery period, El Movimiento, and through the Contemporary, we will journey through a poetic odyssey that navigates through a diversity of poets, storytellers, singers/songwriters, and spoken word artists whose work honors the poetic tradition in a diversity of forms. In addition, we will explore a multiplicity of genres such as cuentos, corridos, inditas, and alabados as forms of ritual and cultural expression in the written and oral tradition. Literature, film, video, music and live recitals will inform our analysis. We will have guest presenters as well as attend local readings and events. Students will be required to write brief response papers to the course readings and subject matter. Other course requirements will be addressed in the syllabus.

CHMS 393 020 41791 Survey of Chicano Literature
TR 1100-1215 Elena Aviles