Spring 2013

CHICANA AND CHICANO STUDIES COURSES

CHMS 201 001 21408 Introduction to Chicana and Chicano Studies– TR 1230-1345 – Michael Trujillo

What does it mean to be “Chicano”, “Mexican American”, “Hispanic” or “Latino” in the United States? Over the past four decades, Chicano/a Studies has emerged as a complex and sometimes controversial field within both the U.S. academy and New Mexican popular
debate. This course will introduce students
to the field of Chicano/a Studies and the related issues that impact and shape U.S. Latina/o communities. We will focus on New Mexican communities that might define themselves as Hispano, Mexicano, Chicano, Hispanic, Spanish, or Mexican, and will also address issues pertinent to the U.S. more generally. The study of the U.S.-Mexico border and its geographic and conceptual shifts will be the course’s central organizing theme. This border is both a political barrier etched into the landscape and, perhaps even more significantly, a metaphorical space of cultural and identity formation that addresses racial, gender, sexual, and class borders as well.

CHMS 201 003 32402 Introduction to Chicana and Chicano Studies –
(* Online) – Joseph García

What does it mean to be “Chicano”, “Mexican American”, “Hispanic” or “Latino” in the United States? Over the past four decades, Chicano/a Studies has emerged as a complex and sometimes controversial field within both the U.S. academy and New Mexican popular
debate. This course will introduce students
to the field of Chicano/a Studies and the related issues that impact and shape U.S. Latina/o communities. We will focus on New Mexican communities that might define themselves as Hispano, Mexicano, Chicano, Hispanic, Spanish, or Mexican, and will also address issues pertinent to the U.S. more generally. The study of the U.S.-Mexico border and its geographic and conceptual shifts will be the course’s central organizing theme. This border is both a political barrier etched into the landscape and, perhaps even more significantly, a metaphorical space of cultural and identity formation that addresses racial, gender, sexual, and class borders as well.

CHMS 342 001 43610 Race Culture Genders – MW 1200-1315 – Carmen Samora

Hispano and Native perspectives of NM history begin with colonialism, military history, politics, economics, but must also consider culture, gender , and class to understand the resilience of people as actors in their own history.

CHMS 332 021 21410 Intro to Chicana Studies – TR 1100-1215 – Irene Vasquez

This general survey course introduces students to knowledge production on and academic approaches relevant to Chicana women’s diverse and changing social statuses from the times of Indigenous sovereignties preceding European interventions in Mexico to the late 20th century. The course traces economic and political transitions highlighting generalized mutations of racial/ethnic, gender, sexuality, social rank/class, and cultural expressions reflecting the conditions and the dominant attitudes of women’s subordination. Course materials will highlight Chicana/Mexican/Indigenous women’s attempts to challenge notions of inferiority and rationalizations for dominance through actions and power contestations and, in turn, contextualize these actions socially, economically and politically.

CHMS 393 003 34040 Chicana Feminisms – M 1900-2130 – Carmen Samora

This topics course explores the history and development of Chicana Feminisms with special attention to how Chicana feminists voice their concerns and politics on a wide
range of issues including race, class, gender, sexuality and language. We will explore the different waves of feminism and feminist historiography to understand how Chicana feminists differ from European and U.S. Feminist Movements and how Chicana Feminism draws from a cultural and historical tradition of strong female figures. At the same time, we will explore how Chicana feminists express a women of color politics in the US that has allowed for cross-cultural communication with Third World and Transnational feminist efforts across the globe. Attention is also given to contributions of New Mexican women, many with ties to UNM, to Chicana Feminist efforts across time.

CHMS 393 001 44663 Vatos-Homegirls in Lit and Film – TR 0930-1045 – Lorena Galvan

This course will focus on the cultural and ethnic representation of El Pachuco/a, El Vato Loco and La Chola in Chicana/o literature and film to analyze how Chicanas/os, and mainstream America construct and re-figure these subjects. At issue will be the performance of gendered bodies and politicized mythos by which these social subjects are seen as an embodiment of revolutionary identity by some and as delinquent subjects by others. This course begins with the zoot suit subculture of the early 1940s; moves to Chicano movement narratives of El Pachuco, next the literature and film of the 1990s that offer many interpretive possibilities for how El Vato and La Chola are represented, and concludes with contemporary Chicana homegirl narratives that challenge and disrupt private and public norms.

CHMS 393 021 45230 Chicano Civil Rights – R 1830-2100 – Jacobo Baca

This course examines Chicano Civil Rights by exploring collective social action for immigration rights/reform, education rights/reform, labor rights, treaty rights, legal justice, environmental justice, veteran’s rights and political representation; and against racial discrimination, police brutality, foreign wars and displacement through urban reform.

CHMS 393 004 43607 NM Villages and Culture – W 1600-1830 – Levi Romero

Before the age of strip malls, big-box supercenters, store-bought produce, and cyberspace social networks, New Mexicans gathered in plazas, grew their own vegetable gardens, and engaged in platicas to share stories and exchange knowledge and information. This course will examine dynamic New Mexican cultural settings and traditions such as plazas, resolanas, matanzas, acequia culture. Students will read from narratives that celebrate community and explore New Mexico’s not-so-easily-forgotten past.

CHMS 393 012 32402 Chicanos in Global Society (*online) – Joseph Garcia

This course engages students in developing a
greater understanding of Latino communities
and peoples in the U.S. in a global context.
Key concepts to be covered throughout the
course include: globalization, transnational capitalism, global cities, transnational social movements, transnational migrations, gendered experiences, and race and ethnicity within the U.S. social structure. Students will explore what it means to live in the U.S. Empire in the 21st century.

CHMS 393 018 41474 Cine Chicano y Latino – TR 1400-1515- Patricia Rosas- Lopategui

En este curso estudiaremos aspectos de la cultura chicana y latinoamericana relacionados con género, raza, política e inmigración a través de filmes representativos de México, Estados Unidos, Chile, Argentina, Cuba, Bolivia, entre otros países. También leeremos algunas obras de teatro de Elena Garro con el propósito de enriquecer la comprensión de lectura. Los temas de las obras teatrales estarán relacionados con algunas de las películas. De esta manera, las/los estudiantes desarrollarán las habilidades de escuchar, leer y hablar la lengua española.

CHMS 351 — 00000 Expediciones – Nahuatl (*online) – John Sullivan

This intensive course employs a combined
communicative and cultural approach
designed to develop both language
proficiency and target culture competence.
In this course, students will develop communicative skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing at a basic level. This is accomplished through a communicative approach based
on activities related to specific functions, contexts, and grammar/ vocabulary relevant to common life situations. Sessions are highly participatory and interactive, utilizing frequent pair and small group work. In addition to the teacher’s input, students are expected to share responsibility for their own learning and that of their classmates through participation, their contributions, and other tasks.
CHMS 393 020 47879 Writers in the Community

CHMS 393 023 47896 Borderlands – Roles of Women (UNM West campus) – Teresa Cordova

CHMS 393 022 47895 Popular Music of the Chicano Movement – (UNM West) – Teresa Cordova